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50% of smokers will die prematurely of a smoking related condition1

The effects of smoking:

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) causes 25,000 deaths in England every year,2
with smoking responsible for 86% of these.2

Smokers are 3x more likely to have a stroke than non-smokers.3

Smoking related conditions are responsible for nearly half a million hospital admissions each year.4

Smoking costs the National Health Service (NHS) approximately £2 billion a year for treating diseases caused by smoking.5

The benefits of smoking cessation:

Quitting smoking leads to a 43% decreased risk of hospitalisation due to COPD.6

Within 2 years of quitting smoking the risk of a stroke will be halved and within 5 years it will be the same as a non-smoker.7 

Smoking cessation drastically helps lower the 1,300 daily smoker related admissions4 for smoking related illnesses. 

For every £1 invested in tobacco control, £2.37 is saved on treating smoking-related disease and lost productivity.5 


 

Imagine what you could achieve by freeing your practice from the devastating effects of smoking

Increasing quitters in general practice frees up clinical time and reduces unplanned admissions: A case study 
Results (Feb 2013 -Apr 2015)*

*The below results are taken from a case study following the implementation of a smoking cessation programme.

Adapted from Primary Care Respiratory UPDATE. Vol 3, Issue 3, Autumn 2016 42:43 and Simkins, S. Implementation of a Stop Smoking Service at Practice Level. Local QIPP Implementation. September 2016. 
 

20 more

appointments available per week, following a 65% reduction in appointments taken up by smokers8

44% drop

in GP appointments for smokers with long-term conditions, saving £15,4448

£623,500 saved

from a 50% reduction in unplanned hospital admissions9

£10,290 saved

from a 50% reduction in home visits

 

Helping your patients to quit can have a positive impact on their lives as well as on the NHS

Click here to access training on how to support your patients to quit

1. Doll R, et al. Mortality in relation to smoking: 50 years’ observations on male British doctors. BMJ 2004; 328:1519
2. Chronic smoking-related lung disease blights over 1 million lives in England. Public Health England. Available from: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/chronic-smoking-related-lung-disease-... (Accessed August 2017)
3. Stroke Association. Smoking and the risk of stroke. https://www.stroke.org.uk/sites/default/files/smoking_and_the_risk_of_st... (Accessed July 2017)
4. NHS Digital. Statistics on Smoking, England – 2017 [NS]. Available from: http://content.digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB24228 (Accessed August 2017)
5. ASH. Tobacco economics March 2017. http://ash.org.uk/category/information-and-resources/fact-sheets/ (Accessed July 2017)
6. Godtfredsen NS, et al. Risk of hospital admission for COPD following smoking cessation and reduction: a Danish population study. Thorax 2002;57(11):967-72.
7. How smoking affects your body. NHS. Available from https://www.nhs.uk/smokefree/why-quit/smoking-health-problems (Accessed August 2017).
8. Simkins, S. Implementation of a Stop Smoking Service at Practice Level. Local QIPP Implementation. September 2016.
9. Primary Care Respiratory UPDATE. Vol 3, Issue 3, Autumn 2016 42:43

PP-CHM-GBR-2429. December 2018

Smoking cessation and CHAMPIX